Peeling Back the Layers of Successful Sponsorships

By Kim Barclay

Why should your company consider any sponsorship?  There are more reasons than you think.  Everyone knows that sponsorships give you brand visibility.  Whether it be at an in-person event or an on-line presence, being a sponsor will get your company seen.  But it’s much deeper than that.  A sponsorship should be seen as an investment.  Yes, one expects return on that investment and to get the most bang for the buck, but most times there is not an immediate, tangible ROI.  Sponsorships need to be thought of as a foundation to build on.  Building relationships with organizations and individuals in your target market.  Being a sponsor can give you credibility, and a positive reputation and perception from your audience.

But sponsorship is a two-way street.  The benefiting organization needs to be flexible, open minded and listen to what potential sponsors want and how they want it.  The old standard of having levels with pre-selected benefits isn’t always the right fit.  Organizations need to reach out and ask potential sponsors what they are seeking and work together to make it happen.  Thinking out of the box and coming up with the most incredible and outrageous ideas, and then working down to what is reasonable and realistic is far easier and more creative than trying to work up hill.

Why should my company be a sponsor?

  1. Brand Visibility – Basic Marketing 101. Be seen in person and on social media.  The Event Marketing Institute reported that 98 percent of attendees create social content during events. When attendees share photos, quotes, videos, and blogs, you get exposure to much larger networks. User-generated content has a greater impact on customers, so make it easy for people to tag your business on social media.
  2. Creating a positive perception – Your target audience will be thankful for your “good will” for the good of the cause.
  3. Building relationships – Think long term. Foster and nurture your relationships.  You may not acquire direct business from a member or attendee, but they know who you are and will pass along your information and say how great you are.
  4. Networking and Sales Goals – Sponsorships are another tool for networking and meeting new potential clients and customers. As your prospect list grows, your ability to reach your sales goals increase.
  5. Return on Investment – The biggest mistake people and companies alike make, is expecting immediate customer and client interaction. ROI is a process and it can take months even years to see your hard work pay off.  Be patient, and continue to build on your foundation.

Sponsorships are incredibly important to both the sponsoring company and the benefiting organization.  Having realistic expectations, and verbalizing the wants and needs of the sponsorship and working together will create very successful partnerships.

Kim Barclay is a Chief Staff Executive at Partners In Association Management and is the FSAE 2019 Conference Sponsorship Chair.  Kim has over 20 years’ experience in Association Management, Event Planning and Fundraising. Reprinted with permission, FSAE Source Magazine January/February 2019 issue.

EBPHI – Maintaining a National Standard

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By: Dee Kring, CAE, CMP

The Examination Board of Professional Home Inspectors (EBPHI), a 501(c)(6) not for profit organization, is one of Partners’ newer clients, joining us in September, 2016.  EBPHI will always be extra special to me as they were the first organization I would serve in the role as Executive Director.

EBPHI is not a traditional association. They are governed by a 13-member volunteer board of directors, they have no membership, and they do not hold conferences or offer continuing education. They are also not a certification body. What is it, then, that they do? Continue reading “EBPHI – Maintaining a National Standard”

Culture is King

By: John Ricco, CAE

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Unless you’ve been hiding under a rock for the past decade you’ve probably read about, heard about, and seen entirely too many PowerPoint presentations about organizational culture.  The articles, books and discussions focus on both corporate culture as well as the culture in not for profit (NFP) organizations.  One might argue that in the NFP community, culture plays an even more important role due to the passion and “all-in” commitment of those associated with promoting their chosen industry or cause.

Partners takes culture very seriously — both ours as “the Partners team” and the way that culture integrates with the cultures of the organizations we serve.  While each association has its own distinct values and beliefs, we like to think our organization’s culture infuses that of the associations we manage Continue reading “Culture is King”

Florida Life Care Residents Association (FLiCRA) – A Good Example of Grassroots in Action

By: Bennett Napier, CAE

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The lead off organization being featured is actually the company’s longest term client, the Florida Life Care Residents Association (FLiCRA). I started as their Executive Director twenty six years ago, and they transitioned with me as our first client association, when our AMC formally opened. Continue reading “Florida Life Care Residents Association (FLiCRA) – A Good Example of Grassroots in Action”

YOU’VE BEEN SERVED

By:  Dee Kring, CAE, CMP

What is the first thing you would do if your organization were faced with a lawsuit?  I’m not an attorney, nor an insurance agent, so it may seem strange for me to answer this question.  However, I’ve learned a few lessons in my association management career that I’m compelled to pass on to other association professionals because many of us (perhaps in a state of panic) would answer the question with “call an attorney”.  I will save you the call and tell you the first question an attorney will ask you: “what type of insurance do you have?” Continue reading “YOU’VE BEEN SERVED”